Police certificate

Name

Police certificate

Issued by

The National Police Chiefs’ Council Criminal Records Office (often referred to as ACRO)

Use

For individuals that wish to emigrate to a number of countries, including Australia, Belgium, Canada, Cayman Islands, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States of America.

They are also used to obtain a visa for immigration purposes (e.g. travel to the US for tourism purposes)

What it contains

All convictions, reprimands, warnings and cautions recorded on UK Police systems, although it doesn’t disclose anything that is eligible to be ‘stepped down’. Read more about the step down model.

How to apply

Visit the Police Certificate section of the ACRO website to view the application form and guidance notes.

Who can apply for it

Anyone who has lived in the UK for any length of time, regardless of nationality

Contact details

A: ACRO, PO Box 481, Fareham, PO14 9FS
T: 0845 60 13 999 or 01962 871111 (if calling from outside the UK)
E: customer.service@acro.pnn.police.uk
W: www.acro.police.uk

Cost

£45 (standard service) and £80 (premium service)

How long it takes

The standard service takes 10 working days and the premium service takes 2 working days, not including dates of receipt or dispatch.

However, if you are due to travel shortly, ACRO suggest that you may want to consider the premium service. However, if you have an arrest/conviction on your record and are using a police certificate to go through an approval process (such as applying for a visa to travel to the US), it is unlikely that, at such short notice, you will be able to complete the other steps in the process.

Where it is sent

It is sent to the applicant at the address requested on the application form

A sample certificate

police

Click the image above to increase the size. This is a sample certificate with ficticious details. The only change is that the logo at the top will now be the National Police Chiefs’ Council, as ACRO is now part of that organisation. 

How to correct inaccurate information

If you feel the information is inaccurate, you will need to contact your local Police Force outlining the inaccurate information. Each Chief Police Officer is the Data Controller for their PNC record, and has the ability to delete information. There is an exceptional case procedure, but this is normally confined to deleting local police information.

My Police Certificate doesn’t contain some details that it should / I’ve got a ‘No Live Trace’; what should I do?

If you have been arrested and/or convicted outside in the UK and your Police Certificate states “No Trace” or “No Live Trace” (or does not list in full your arrests/convictions), you might still be required to provide details (e.g. when applying for a visa). You may want to apply to the individual court to obtain a record of all convictions and any charges pending.

‘No Trace’ means that you have no convictions, reprimands, final warnings or cautions held on the Police National Computer.

‘No Live Trace’ means that there is criminal record information held on the Police National Computer but it has been ‘stepped down’.  Anyone who sees this and understands this phrase can assume that you have a criminal record from the past, even if they can’t see the details. If this applies to you, we advise that you contact ACRO to obtain details of the conviction information that was not disclosed on your Certificate.  If you have requested a Police Certificate for travel purposes, many Embassies will require this detail in order to make a decision on whether or not they should issue you with a visa.  Once you receive the undisclosed information from ACRO you will be required to contact the relevant Embassy and disclose your previous conviction/s.

Once the Embassy has this information they will contact ACRO to verify that the conviction details you have provided them with are correct.  They will do this in the form of an email quoting what details you have provided and asking ACRO to confirm whether it is correct or not.  ACRO can only confirm or deny what has been related by the Embassy.  If the information you have provided isn’t correct, the Embassy will ask you to contact ACRO again in order to go through your conviction details so they can be re-submitted to the relevant Embassy.

The Embassies use this process to gauge honesty and integrity and whether you have presented yourself as someone of general good character.

Other information

  • Applications for other countries may be accepted subject to confirmation by the applicant of acceptance by the relevant Embassy, High Commission or requiring organisation
  • ACRO are currently piloting this initiative, which provides police certificates for visa purposes. This police certificate is issued solely for immigration purposes and shows details of arrests and convictions. It covers the whole of the United Kingdom and is sent to the address provided at the time of the application. It is different to a Subject Access Request (SAR), which can be used to find out any details held on the Police National Computer, including allegations
  • More information about Police Certificates is available here
  • ACRO still apply the principles of the step-down process when processing Police Certificates. More information on step-down is available here

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
  • paul carter

    Hi, my acro came back no live trace, something that i did 13 years ago (DR10, Drink Driving offence), but would i be rejected to work in Saudi Arabia. Has anyone been through similar experience where they got rejected or accepted. Thanks for your help.

  • Anonymouse16

    Do you think that there may possibly be room to question the legality of the “no live trace” aspect of ACPO certificates? It effectively perpetuates an ex-offenders criminal record, even when their crime are stepped down under UK law. Surely there is scope to close or scrutinise this loophole?

  • Tom D Read

    Wouldn’t it be better, seeing as you know why people apply for records check, to have all the information that they need instead of issuing half the information (stepped down for example) and wasting the applicants time and money and an interview slot at the embassy.

  • Rob Pinnock

    Re: Paul Carters comment. I recently had to apply for a police certificate issued within the last 6 months for an interview at the US Embassy in August. This stated ‘No Live Trace’. The original certificate issued 2008 stated ‘No Trace’ (all convictions were in the ’70’s – none since). So as Paul infers quite rightly, there is an attempt to ‘step up’ a persons record, not to ‘step down’. Having spoken to 2 persons at NPCC by phone to query this, I was met with evasive answers eg, they didn’t know why as no records now exist prior to 2008 I believe it was